HMP Foston Hall, General Details

Foston Hall was built in 1863 as a family home and was acquired by the Prison Service in 1953. Since then it has been used as a detention centre, an immigration centre and a satellite of nearby HMP Sudbury. Shut in 1996, it reopened on 31 July 1997 as a closed women’s prison following major refurbishment and building work.

 

Accommodation

  • A wing, Forty-two beds, a mixture of mainly sentenced women and young adults. The wing accommodated many women participating in the Cameo Unit intervention, part of the national offender personality disorder strategy for those with complex needs and personality disorders.
  • B wing , Forty-two beds, a mixture of mainly sentenced women and young adults.
  • C wing , Forty-one beds, mainly remanded women and young adults.
  • D wing , Thirty-five beds for women with no set criteria on status or sentence length in dormitory accommodation. Six cells held three or more women.
  • D wing annex   Two gated observation cells accommodating women in crisis, separated from D wing by a locked door.
  • F wing , Sixty-three beds for mainly sentenced women and young adults; 20 cells held two people.
  • Remand wing    First night and detoxification unit for 63 remand and sentenced women and young adults. Twenty-four cells held two people.
  • T wing, Fifty-eight beds for mainly sentenced women and young adults. Twenty-five cells held two people and a further eight cells held only one person.

The prison is part of the East Midlands region. It has a capacity of 344 and the #1 governor is called Carl Davies.

Foston Hall